Molecular Physiology of Hearing

Prof. Dr. Marlies Knipper

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery
Tübingen Hearing Research Centre
Elfriede-Aulhorn-Strasse 5
D-72076 Tübingen
Germany

Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88244
Fax: +49 (0)7071 - 29 4950
marlies.knipper@uni-tuebingen.de

Research Interest

Our primary research focuses on the critical period of inner ear development prior to cochlear functioning. This developmental period comprises the stage when the immature organ evolves into a functional adult organ of Corti via synchronous morphogenetic processes. With biological techniques we analyze epigenetic factors (growth and thyroid), and transcription factors (cis-trans-elements) regulating inner ear developmental phases.

Further research interests are directed towards the upregulation processes of protein structures of the outer hair cell (motor and cytoskeletal proteins) during phenotypical outer hair cell differentiation prior to hearing onset.

Other projects include studying the molecular mechanisms behind trauma to the auditory system. The molecular changes following sensory trauma and the subsequent response of the central nervous system are poorly understood. We are focused on finding a molecular tool for monitoring the features of excitability which occur following acoustic trauma or ototoxic insult to the auditory system. Concentrated sodium salicylate is known to induce high frequency hearing loss and tinnitus in humans and rodents. Tinnitus perception is known to be associated with altered neuronal excitability in peripheral and central auditory neurons.

Of particular interest are genes that alter their expression pattern during activity-induced changes in synaptic efficacy and plasticity. The immediate-early genes brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the activity-dependent cytoskeletal protein (Arg3.1, also known as Arc), and c-Fos are known to be affected by changes in excitability and plasticity. We are using RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to study these genes following induction of tinnitus.

Research Scientists

Molecular Neurobiology


Monika Gaus, administration
Phone: +49 (0) 7071 - 29 88243


Kerstin Just, administration
Phone: +49 (0) 7071 - 29 29 88242


Dr. Ulrike Zimmermann, research scientist
Phone: +49 (0) 7071 - 29 88245


Dr. Wibke Singer, research scientist
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88246


Dr.med. John Thiericke, research scientist
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88196 / Funk 2705


Hyun-Soon Geisler, Technician
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88268


Iris Köpschall, Technician
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88245


Karin Rohbock, Technician
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88245


Dan Bing, PhD student
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88276


Dario Campanelli, PhD student
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88246


Kamyar Kasini, PhD student
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88202


Benjamin Lange, IT Support
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88268

Electrophysiology


Dr. Lukas Rüttiger (Head of Lab)
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88260


Lewis, Sze Chim Lee, PhD student
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88195


Dorit Moehrle, MSc Student
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88184


Steffen Wolter, PhD student
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88202

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Yan Zhu, PhD student
Phone: +49 (0)7071 - 29 88279

Publications

2014

2013

2012

Knipper M, Müller M, Zimmermann U
"Molecular Mechanism of Tinnitus."
In: Springer Handbook of Audidory Research: TINNITUS (Eggermont JJ, Zeng F-G, Popper AN, Fay RR, eds). Springer New York Heidelberg, Dordrecht London, pp. 59-82. (2012)

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999 - 1995

   
   
Last modified: 23.07.2014 12:17